The Treaty of Versailles (1919) (Excerpts)

Germany is forbidden to maintain or construct any fortifications either on the left bank of the Rhine or on the right bank to the west of a line drawn 50 kilometres to the East of the Rhine. . . .

As compensation for the destruction of the coal mines in the north of France and as part payment towards the total reparation due from Germany for the damage resulting from the war, Germany cedes to France in full and absolute possession . . . the coal mines situated in the Saar Basin. . . .

The High Contracting Parties, recognising the moral obligations to redress the wrong done by Germany in 1871 both to the rights of France and to the wishes of the Population of Alsace and Lorraine, which were separated from their country in spite of the solemn protest of their representatives at the Assembly of Bordeau [returns these areas to France]. . . .

Germany acknowledges and will respect strictly the independence of Austria. . . .

Germany, in conformity with the action already taken by the Allied and Associated Powers, recognises the complete independence of the Czecho-Slovak State. . . .

Germany, in conformity with the action already taken by the Allied and Associated Powers, recognises the complete independence of Poland. . . .

Germany acknowledges and agrees to respect as permanent and inalienable the independence of all the territories which were part of the former Russian Empire on August 1, 1914. . . .

Germany renounces on favour of the Principle Allied and Associated Powers all her rights and titles over her oversea possessions. . . .

The German military forces shall be demobilised and reduced as described hereinafter. . . .

The armed forces of Germany must not include any military or naval air forces.

The Allied and Associated Governments affirm and Germany accepts the responsibility of Germany and her allies for causing all the loss and damage to which the Allied and Associated Governments and their nationals have been subjected as a consequence of the war imposed upon them by the aggression of Germany and her allies. . . .

The Allied and Associated Governments . . . require, and Germany undertakes, that she will make compensation for all damage done to the civilian population of the Allied and Associated Powers and to their property during the period of the belligerency of each as an Allied or Associated Power against Germany by such aggression by land, by sea and from the air, and in general all damage as defined in Annex I hereto. . . .

Question:  How does this Treaty compare to the goals of Wilson's Fourteen Points?