Freaking out? a story of baking bread

See this? It’s bread, just good home-baked bread.

So what’s the big deal? It’s that I made it.

You may not know me well, but if you did, you’d know I’m no Dora Domestic. In fact, I used to be somewhat famous for not knowing my way around a kitchen.

But I decided I wanted to make bread. Might have something to do with medieval technology, or just wanting to do something self-sufficient.

It took awhile. I made some doorstops. At first I thought I couldn’t make bread, that I had no talent for it. Other people didn’t help much — they told me to keep at it, because bread was hard to make. Oh no, I thought, it’s too hard. I stopped for awhile.

I kept looking for a good recipe, better yeast, how to get the water exactly 115 degrees. I found a simpler recipe, just water, flour, yeast, salt, sugar, oil. It came out good. I started to tinker with it. The bread got better each time. Now I make it a lot. And it’s easy. I don’t use measuring spoons. It’s peaceful to make it now, instead of stressful.

It wasn’t hard. It was new. That made it seem hard. But I kept doing it, looking for ways to make it better and easier.

Are blogs, web pages, and teaching online new to you? Keep doing it. You don’t need talent, a feel for it, or strong hands. Just keep making the bread. Soon it will be good.

 

 

7 comments to Freaking out? a story of baking bread

  • Hey Lisa, I like the sentiment. Although if that bread was made with medieval technology I might have to pass, too many bits of stone from that careless miller. Plus this way there is no baker running the manor’s oven to take a cut of your handmade bread.

  • Norm Wright

    Reminds me of some good advice I heard once –
    Stop trying harder, start trying different.

  • Coach John

    What a fluffy, wholesome metaphor! Congratulations! You got my attention w/ the bread. Will you share it w/ us in person?

  • Those are some gorgeous loaves, Lisa, you might earn your Donestic Dora badge. This seems another example of getting better at doing something by doing something.

    A friend recommended this simple approach to bread making “My Bread” by Jim Lahey

  • […] Lisa’s post about bread got me thinking about my first online teaching experience.  I thought I’d share for those […]

  • Great sentiment, Lisa. I often find that I want to do things right the first time, & since I have no idea what I’m doing, I find excuses to not do it. I have to keep reminding myself that it’s impossible to do it right on the first go, & that I’ll never get better unless I allow myself to make mistakes. & who knows, some of those “mistakes” might actually be useful in the end.